Category Archives: Uncategorized

Hayes Farmyard Development – The Latest from Rookery

Following the submission of the plans for redeveloping the farmyard at Hayes Street Farm, your local councillors have been in pressing owners Rookery Estates for clarity on the future of the rest of the land.

The open farmland is not part of the development plans, and as ‘virgin’ green belt is heavily protected against future development regardless of whether the farmyard plans are approved or not. Understandably though, many residents are still worried about what may happen once the farm is no longer operating in its current form.

Rookery tell us that they “envisage having horses on the farm for the foreseeable future although these will be live out horses. No new livery buildings are anticipated. The fishing lake has been let for 10 years so [we] expect this to continue into the future”.

On the future of the boot fairs, George Hoeltschi “has been given permission to hold boot fairs for the next 2 seasons only but Rookery would probably need to curtail this after this year if planning permission is approved for the development”.

Questions remain though about how the future of the rest of the farm can be further secured. Local opinion is split on the boot fairs, but will the land still be viable with just the trout fishery and only live-out provision for horses, for example?

As regards the development proposals themselves, the application for the farmyard plans is open for comment until 24th January. As your local councillors we will be formulating our own detailed response to the plans soon and have already asked that the application is put before a committee for a public hearing, should the recommendation from planning officers be for approval.

20180119_133504_crop.jpg

Advertisements

Bromley Town Centre – ‘Site G’ Plans Updated

The public will have a chance this week to see the latest plans for the next major redevelopment in Bromley Town Centre.
Aerial site view - Churchill Gardens-600x320
The area officially known as ‘Site G’ – between Ethelbert Road and the Churchill Theatre to the west of the High Street, is planned to include, according to the developers:

  • A new plaza and the creation of Churchill Square;
  • New homes, including affordable homes;
  • High quality retail and commercial space; and
  • Flexible community space to accommodate Bromley Town Vision Church.

The proposals, named “Churchill Quarter” have been recently amended and will be open to public view on:

  • Thursday 16th November 2pm to 7pm
  • Friday 17th November midday to 5pm
  • Saturday 18th November 10am to 2pm

… all at The Wells’ Room in the Churchill Theatre. From Monday 20th the developers will also post the latest plans on their website.

Bourne Way Shops Parking Overhaul Planned

A significant improvement for pedestrians and motorists is planned for the section of Bourne Way between Old Station Yard and Station Approach.

This small area is heavily used by both pedestrians, clientele of the shops and takeaways and short term parking. However, this makes for a dangerous and untidy situation.

Bourne Way at the top of Station Approach

The new plans will see the pavement relaid, proper parking bays set out and new cycle racks installed.

Kingsway Shopping Area Set For Improvements

Kingsway, Coney Hall

After some years of working with various groups, including traders and the Coney Hall Village Residents’ Association, we can at last report that plans have been unveiled for some improvements to the area of Kingsway in front of the shops.

The pavements are to be relaid and improved, and pay & display parking bays introduced on the western (‘Wickes’) side to ensure a better turnover of parking spaces.

Work continues in partnership with the Residents’ Association on plans for a notice board and other possible improvements, and we will continue to seek ways to discourage HGVs from venturing too far into Kingsway and beyond where they have been known to get stuck while turning round.

What’s Happening to Bromley’s Libraries?

Bromley’s Conservative Councillors have moved to dispel fears over changes to the borough’s libraries following a misinformation campaign by activists.

Some residents have been in touch with us recently about the proposals to ‘outsource’ Bromley’s libraries to a not-for-profit company.

The Council has confirmed that the proposed changes to the library service will not lead to a single library closing, or a single minute being taken off opening times. If the proposal is approved, the operator would need to run the same level of service or better.

The Council has spent a lot of time looking at the way it works in order to protect frontline services, bearing in mind the tough financial environment it’s facing. Over the next few years, Bromley has to find £24m of savings from a £192m budget. Doing nothing is not an option. It has long been recognised by councils of all political colours, that commissioning companies and charitable trusts to provide services brings value for money for the council tax payer and improved efficiency.

The proposal would keep all libraries open while reducing costs. The libraries would remain in council control, with professional librarians, but would be run by Greenwich Leisure Limited (GLL) – a not-for-profit organisation which was established by a Labour authority to run their library and leisure services. It is virtually identical model to the charitable trust which has successfully run the Borough’s leisure centres since 2004. Staff will be transferred under TUPE regulations protecting their terms and conditions and membership of the Council’s pension scheme.

The savings would be achieved through economies of scale; GLL operates more libraries than Bromley council, so it has greater buying power – for example when purchasing books and computers. It could also reduce back office costs through avoiding duplicate tasks.  Public consultations have been supportive of the proposals. In a consultation of 1,837 people in 2014-15, 57% of respondents supported the option of the library service being run by a trust or charitable provider. This is exactly the proposal.

The council also continues to invest in libraries – with brand new ones opening in Penge, Orpington and Biggin Hill over recent years – and is looking to continue that trend, for example at Chislehurst library.

A232/A21/Locksbottom Roadworks

Though not in our ward, many Hayes & Coney Hall residents will be affected by road resurfacing works that Transport for London have announced for the Croydon Road (A232), Hastings Road (A21) and Farnborough Common (including the Fantail/Chapter One junction). The project is scheduled to start on Tuesday 7th March lasting until Thursday 13th April. Various closures and diversion will be in place, though the actual works will take place at nighttime between 9pm and 5am.

The timetable is as follows:

7-14 March 2017 – TfL will put in some temporary traffic lights, enabling traffic to continue to flow on the A21 Hastings Road From 21:00 each night until 05:00 the following morning

15-23 March and 3-6 April – The A232 Croydon Road will be closed between the junctions with the A21 Farnborough Common and Oakley Road. Please follow the signed diversion

26 March – 2 April and 9-13 April – The A232 Croydon Road will be closed between the junctions with Hollydale Drive and the A21 Farnborough Common – The A232 Crofton Road will be closed between the junctions with Farnborough Common and Elm Walk. Please follow the signed diversions.

roadworks

Phone Boxes Becoming a Thing of the Past?

BT are consulting on the proposed removal of a number of telephone boxes around the borough, including in Hayes and Coney Hall.

Boxes where very few calls have been made are being earmarked for removal. In our ward these are:

  • Junction of Hayes Lane and Mead Way (19 calls in the last year)
  • Junction of Mounthurst Road and Bourne Vale (12 calls)
  • Outside the the Day Lewis pharmacy at 3 Station Approach (25 calls)
  • Outside the Co-Op in Croydon Road, Coney Hall (4 calls)

Any comments should be sent via the council planning department who have been asked to respond to BT by 4th December at the latest.

Another Phone Mast Refused

The mobile ‘phone mast proposed for the green at the junction of Birch Tree Avenue and Queensway was turned down by a council planning committee last night.

The committee heard representations from both residents’ associations and Cllr. Graham Arthur, who cited the quality of consultation, lack of explanation as to why alternative sites had been ruled out, and the potential harm to the openness of the green caused by the equipment cabinet. The committee then agreed unanimously to reject the bid by Vodafone and Telefonica (O2).
20160121_135555 522x283.jpg
Pre-empting accusations of ‘Nimbyism’, Cllr. Arthur had pointed out that an application for another, more appropriate, site in the ward had recently been approved without opposition from local councillors.

The refusal comes after last year’s plans to erect a taller mast on another green, at the junction of Kingsway and Gates Green Road, were turned down on similar grounds.

What’s Happening About Paper Banks Over Christmas?

We know that around Christmas the paper recycling banks get very full (and then some). So, what is the council doing about it, and how can you help?

paperbank (fareham).jpg

Firstly the contractor, Veolia, will be emptying as many of the banks this week as possible to try and make as much space available as they can ahead of the big day(s).

However, this year we are anticipating particular issues with Christmas Day and Boxing Day falling on a Friday and Saturday, thus delaying by another day the work to empty the bins.

Veolia will be back out again on Monday and Tuesday (28th/29th) to catch up. However, we are asking residents, where possible (we do understand some will have more space at home than others), to hold off taking used wrapping paper and packaging to the paper banks until after Tuesday 29th.

Not only will this help keep the appearance of the sites tidier, it will also improve the borough’s recycling rates, since anything left outside the recycling bins goes to landfill (because it is not practical or cost-effective to sort through random bags and boxes left in this way).

More generally, the council has also been looking closely at the various sites and collection routes, taking in account the amount of paper, cardboard and other material that gets left there at this and other times of year.

Finally, we wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!